This is the Final portion of our conversation with Lisa M. Shasteen, Attorney and Partner at Shasteen and Percy and Dr. Gino Collura of CEO Effectiveness.

Gino:
So that brings us to our next point. So right now many professionals, they’re in a constant search, right, for the best ways to bring their team, their vision, their mission, and target market all together. What are three things from your experience and your tenure that you would recommend to any business owner or leader to encourage continued collaboration and synergy with their team and with their market?

Lisa Shasteen:
Well, it’s kind of like in real estate: Location, location, location. I would say transparency, transparency, transparency, because I think it’s really transparency enabling the conversation and then having the will to adapt, which is the hardest part. You can have all these ideas and everybody feels good and slaps each other on the back and walks down the hall and goes back to their offices and goes back to their regular work. But it’s like, well, what are we changing today? What is the most productive thing that we could do? If we could do anything to change where we are today and costs were no object, what would we do? There is a version of that. I like to rehab houses. It’s just fun for me, but I don’t have a billion dollars, right, so I can’t just spend on just anything that I want, if that makes sense, so I have to adapt. I might see a look, but I might have to adapt it to get that look in a little bit different way. It can be done. And so it’s just a matter of creativity and allowing those ideas to come in, but also being transparent about what you want to accomplish, where you want to go, and making people stakeholders in it and saying, “This is your company, too. I want to hear your ideas”, and then visibly make the changes that others suggest. Not you, but others.

Gino:
Absolutely. It’s interesting. Our founder, Dr. Bill Anton, which I know you’re very good friends with, he thinks the world of you, but when we think about… And he always says this. He always says, “Conversation should be at the level of dialogue”, right? So being able to invite and encourage folks to come to the table, not feel any sort of pressure or not feel afraid to voice their thoughts and their ideas, there’s a liberation quality to that and the idea of some saying, “I can actually be myself with this organization. And by the way, this organization I spend 50-60-70 hours a week of my life at”, which that’s the majority of their time, is spent with these folks in this environment. That’s such an incredible thing, I think, especially when feeding morale, being able to [inaudible 00:20:10] folks having continuous buy-in into the company and truly giving their best, which is what every administrator, manager, business owner obviously wants from their team.

Gino:
So in your opinion, Lisa, what’s the most effective way to lead others?

Lisa Shasteen:
I think by listening and being loyal to them. Loyalty is extremely important. It is a rare quality today. Most companies look at people as worker bees and expendable, sadly so. And I tell you, the employees I speak with in my company or other places really value a sense of loyalty, and I think if you have a sense of team, we’re doing this together, we may all make mistakes, I may make mistakes, you guys can point that out. That’s okay. I need to learn. I’m constantly on a learning mission, right, but allowing people to collaborate and voice their opinions and ideas without fear and being loyal to them and saying, “You know what? I got your back. If somebody comes after you, I got your back. You may have made a mistake and I may have to admit that, but at the same time I’m going to give you a chance and say, you know what? We all make mistakes. It’s okay.”

Lisa Shasteen:
So the sense of perfection that we’ve grown up with, some of us, that everybody expects perfection, it’s a very difficult standard. I know a lot of people who are in the CEO level are perfectionists, and they got there by demanding the best, which is fine. It’s fine to have high standards, but I think also understanding and being human when someone doesn’t come up with that standard, not everybody is you. Not everybody can be that 24/7 buzzsaw, you know?

Gino:
So true. That is very profound, Lisa. I think of the hundreds and thousands of clients that we’ve worked with and how many times we have heard folks and employees in particular that say they feel lonely, right, that they feel like they don’t have a voice in their organization, and I think it does go back. There’s such a stark contrast. You have some business owners who they look at their employees as their prize possession. They would not be able to do what they do without their team, and they want them to flourish. Then you have others who believe the employees are here to do one thing: To make you money period, right, and so not healthy, not conducive. Is there some validity to that? Yeah. But there’s so much more. There’s so much more that you want from your team members. So I think that’s a really profound thing that you said.

Gino:
So, Lisa, this is interesting with all these changes that are going on, we’ve touched a lot of different bases thus far, but in your opinion what does the future of business look like in the USA? What do you think, especially with your experience in cybersecurity, your role at InfraGard, what are some of the biggest threats that we face?

Lisa Shasteen:
Well, I’ll tell you the one threat that keeps me up at night is now that we’ve all been forced online and we do everything online that we’re going to have an attack to the power grid, and the power grid is vulnerable. It’s not a secret. It’s vulnerable because it is a compilation of power grids that stretch across the country, some of which are rural power grids that don’t have a lot of protections and would be easy sources. So I fear that now that we’re digital and we’re even going to digital currencies and everything… So as a cyber person and a technology enthusiast… I mean, I’m a nerd, I’m a techie, I’m this weirdo, right? But I fear that somebody’s going to pull the plug and then it’s going to be like well, now what?

Lisa Shasteen:
So I’m kind of old school, too. I like paper statements from my bank. I print them out. I do save things, obviously in locked cabinets and stuff. I mean, because I have to. But if it’s my stuff, I’m sure as heck going to keep a paper copy now with respect to patient records and things like that. That’s a nightmare. I mean, I can’t tell you that there’s an easy solution. I don’t think that everything’s going to be online or digital because I don’t think it’s practical to protect it. The hackers are three times as well funded as the defenders, so it’s a frightening thing out there and I praise the people that are defending us right now and we’re going to be dependent on some really advanced technology like quantum physics to authenticate ourselves and stuff in the future so that there is no hacking. There are some things out there that are just remarkable, but I mean, we’re vulnerable until that comes to the marketplace.

Gino:
And I think so many folks who are not in tune with the cybersecurity world, they don’t know what they don’t know, right? And so the idea of being able to shed a little bit of light on what those vulnerabilities are or what the security threats are. Do you think, Lisa, that the future of business in the USA, especially over the next 24 months, will we continue to see an uptick in online dependence, maybe more people working remotely and doing [crosstalk 00:26:01]?

Lisa Shasteen:
I think so. Yeah. I think so. I mean, I’m realistic about this whole thing. I know that app developers launch apps before they’ve even run a security test. I mean, things just happen because we all love our technology. We love to push a button and have it happen for us, right? I mean, I do, too. I think it’s great. I love Ring doorbells and stuff. All this stuff is insecure, 100% of it. But I think that because of this COVID scare, I think that a lot of people are opting to do a lot of things online and I’m not going to say that that’s not a valid fear. But my personal thought is that we are going to have to learn to live with it because it is not going away and we cannot kill our economy over it. We just can’t kill our country. So we’re going to have to find a way to live with it, and hiding in our houses will not be a long-term solution. So I do think that… I mean, we’re going to do more things digitally because it’s low touch with the worry in the back of my head about the power grid and being able…

Lisa Shasteen:
I think one of the things in people’s contingency and emergency response plans should be how am I going to function if I don’t have the internet?

Gino:
Absolutely. That’s a really good point. Yeah, absolutely.

Gino:
Well, Ms. Lisa Shasteen, thank you so much. This has been incredibly insightful, great conversation, great discussion points. And I know to the viewers who are tuning in, if you all have any questions for Ms. Lisa Shasteen, by all means reach out to us here at CEO Effectiveness. We would be happy to get you in touch with her.

Gino:
If you need any of her legal expertise, Lisa, what’s the best way for folks to get a hold of you that may need the services that you can provide?

Lisa Shasteen:
Well, probably the easiest, email. Please don’t include anything important in it because online can be… It’s info@shasteenpercy.com. That’s S-H-A-S-T-E-E-N-P-E-R-C-Y.com.

Gino:
Outstanding, and we have included that email in our description below of our time with Ms. Lisa today. So Lisa, thank you so much. Have a wonderful day, stay safe, stay healthy, and we look forward to touching base with you again soon.